10 Mosquito Repelling Plants

mosquito-plants

In Arkansas, mosquitos can ruin the best of outside occasions. What could be better than implementing an attractive addition to your garden that will also fend off those pesky insects? Below are a few mosquito repelling plants that we suggest.

1. Basil

An annual, basil is commonly used in cooking but can also act as a mosquito repellant (and we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention how wonderfully the herb goes with your summer tomatoes and a slice of mozzarella cheese)!

2. Chives

A member of the Allium family (think leeks, onions and shallots) chives are a perennial that also produce beautiful purple flowers while helping keep mosquitos at bay.

3. Citronella

An annual, citronella is an active mosquito repellant when it is crushed. Often found in many commercial repellants this option is much more natural!

4. Lemongrass

Containing citronella, lemongrass is a great way to naturally repel mosquitos. And it’s great in the kitchen for flavoring – especially Thai dishes.

5. Lavender

This herb is a member of the mint family and comes in many varieties. Grow outside or close to a window indoors. In addition to being a mosquito repellent, Lavender produces delicate purple flowers and emits a lovely, calming smell.

Lavender

 

 

6. Marigolds

A full sun annual that works well to add color and repel many different insects, including mosquitoes. Marigolds work well in large quantities in a bed or herb garden.

7. Rosemary

Rosemary is a beautiful flowering plant that is commonly used for cooking, and is extremely hardy. Keep this herb in your garden as a natural mosquito repellant!

8. Catnip

Catnip not only repels mosquitoes but other insects as well. When crushed and rubbed on your skin, Catnip is a nontoxic alternative to store-bought sprays. Remember that cats love this herb so we suggest placing it away from other plants in your garden to prevent your furry friends from damaging your entire garden.

9. Ageratum

This bedding plant secretes Coumarin, a scent that mosquitos detest. Consider this little annual a beautiful, mosquito repelling asset to your garden!

Hawaii Blue Ageratum

10. Mint

An herb that contains aromatic properties that many insects find repulsive. Mint is also commonly planted as flavoring for tea or cooking in general and has a scent most people find pleasant.

There are many options to choose from when deciding to implement mosquito repelling plants in your garden. Whether your garden needs a filler plant or a focal point, we’ve got it! Come see us today to get your very own insect-repelling plants.

One thought

  1. Your gardens in Springdale and Fayetteville have supplied my home gardens with host plants for butterflies, namely the Monarchs, and many, many, nectar plants! I would love to talk to you about our Springdale for Monarchs group. Springdale for Monarchs is a not-for-profit and non-funded committee that has grown out of our mayors NWF Monarch Pledge Action. We hold inservice training and love to tell attendees of your healthy plants. We have planted some of your plants at Shiloh Museum in Springdale as well as plans to place some in the new Waystation being designed for the A&M Railroad Depot in Springdale.On October 2, we are having our First Annual Monarch Festival in Springdale. Our mayor will attend our ribbon cutting for this new garden. We would love to have you as a sponsor in our brochure of this event. We are asking for a minimum donation of $100. I would be happy to talk to you more about October 2. Maybe you would like to have a booth at the Depot?
    Mary McCully, Chairman
    (479)841-6517
    /Users/maryemccully/Desktop/Trails and Rails Festival 2016.pdf

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